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Stainless Steel
Stainless steel differs from carbon steel....
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Mechanical Properties
The mechanical properties of stainless steels ....
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Typical Applications
Stainless steels of various kinds are used in thousands of applications....
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Chemical Composition
Chemical Composition Chart Stainless Steel....
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Equivalent Grades
AISI, DIN, JIS Equivalent Grade Table....
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Stainless Steel Strip Tolerance
Stainless Steel Strip Tolerance in Thickness and width....
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Stainless Steel Strip Packaging
Stainless Steel Strips & Coils are packed in 50-4000 kgs coil....
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Stainless Steel
Home > Stainless Steel

In metallurgy stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French "inoxydable", is defined as a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5 or 11% chromium content by mass. Stainless steel does not stain, corrode, or rust as easily as ordinary steel, but it is not stain-proof. It is also called corrosion-resistant steel or CRES when the alloy type and grade are not detailed, particularly in the aviation industry. There are different grades and surface finishes of stainless steel to suit the environment to which the material will be subjected in its lifetime. Stainless steel is used where both the properties of steel and resistance to corrosion are required.

Stainless steel differs from carbon steel by the amount of chromium present. Carbon steel rusts when exposed to air and moisture. This iron oxide film (the rust) is active and accelerates corrosion by forming more iron oxide. Stainless steels contain sufficient chromium to form a passive film of chromium oxide, which prevents further surface corrosion and blocks corrosion from spreading into the metal's internal structure.


Source: Wikipedia